© 2017 — Virtual Reality for Education

VR Design and Theory

  • Designing a Virtual Field Trip Summary

  • Integrating Second Life as a Pedagogical Tool for Interactive Instruction. Summary

  • Multi-modal virtual environments for education with haptic and olfactory feedback. Summary

  • From Content to Context: Videogames as Designed Experience.

  • Using Virtual Reality with and without Gaming Attributes for Academic Achievement. Summary

  • Towards a narrative theory of virtual reality. Summary

  • Digital Media in Archaeological Areas, Virtual Reality, Authenticity and Hyper-Tourist Gaze Summary

  • Virtual worlds, real knowledge: towards a hermeneutics of virtuality.

    Summary


Summaries of Research Papers

 Lacina, J. G. (2004). Designing a Virtual Field Trip. Childhood Education, 80(4), 221–222.

Virtual field trips should completely replace actual field trips. In fact, they are best used as pre- or post-trip activities where students can be guided and given background knowledge. Virtual field trips also require much planning and prep and it is highly recommended that teachers go several virtual trips of their own before planning a class one.


Aylett, R., & Louchart, S. (2003). Towards a narrative theory of virtual reality. Virtual Reality, 7(1), 2–9. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10055-003-0114-9

This article argues that VR is a unique medium that requires a particular narrative theory to properly utilize its features. Most notable in VR is the role of the “user” as “active” rather than “passive”, as in most other media. In their approach to a narrative theory of VR, the authors identify how a plot-centered approach could conflict with the freedom VR offers. Additionally, camera angles in VR are very different than those of traditional cinema. Finally, they propose a  “process view” of story rather than a chronological view of narrative.


 

Costa, N. (2012). Digital Media in Archaeological Areas, Virtual Reality, Authenticity and Hyper-Tourist Gaze. Sociology Mind, 02(01), 53–60. http://doi.org/10.4236/sm.2012.21007

Costa’s article examines the use of virtual reality and other virtual media in different informal learning environments. Primarily, he describes how the primary use of virtual reality is no longer to simply construct worlds, but it is to create emotive experiences that entertain. Thus, virtual reality in these museums and arcaheological areas show now be considered “edutainment”.


 

Aarseth, E. (2001). Virtual worlds, real knowledge: towards a hermeneutics of virtuality. European Review, 9(02), 227–232. http://doi.org/10.1017/S1062798701000205

Aarseth delves into the true meaning of “virtual” and how it applies to “virtual reality” as well as other “virtual” ideas. He argues that virtuality is a new way of interpreting the world and should be used as a better interface than the narrative form (like the story) to generate knowledge.